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Losing Weight Can Drop the Risk of Heart Diseases

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Losing Weight Can Drop the Risk of Heart Diseases

It is no secret that being overweight  is not good for your heart. But a study suggests that people who lose weight also reverse their chances of getting cardiovascular diseases. 

Researchers found out that chances of high cholesterol levels and a high blood pressure were more in the people who were formerly obese. The people who are now at a normal weight don’t feel any of these issues with themselves. 

The doctors of top hospitals in Pakistan said that the risk of diabetes, which is a best friend of obesity, is also seen to be very less in the people who lose weight after obesity. 

The key point of the study was that ‘it is very difficult to lose weight but it prevents cardiovascular diseases’. For the study, researchers observed the risk of cardiovascular diseases in almost 20,200 people. The comparison was made between two groups: One had people who had been obese before and the other had people who were currently obese. The investigators used the data, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of 1999-2013.

It was seen that the people who had been obese in the past were of older age as compared to thos who were currently over weight or never were. They were also observed to be smokers. 

After adjusting the ethnicity, gender age and smoking, the researchers found that the risk of elevated cholesterol level and high blood pressure was same in people who used to be obese and those who had always had a healthy weight. 

However, when compared with people who had always had a healthy weight, people who used to be overweight had 7 times more chances of getting diabetes. They were also 3 times more likely to get high blood pressure and cholesterol. 

The studies also proved that there is no direct link found between weight and reduced risk of heart diseases. The researchers however mentioned that almost everyone in the sample who was obese, stayed that way their whole life. But when they lost weight, it did not only prevent but reverse significant health issues. 

What Happens to Your Heart When You Lose Weight?

Several studies suggest that by losing only 5 to 10 percent of  body weight a person can highly reduce the risk of a heart attack and stroke. ‘As long as you cut calories,  what you eat doesn’t really affect you’.  

Here’s what losing 10 percent of body weight would look like; 

Losing weight will reduce the heart’s workload. Blood vessels are responsible for supplying blood to the heart. As one loses weight, there is less fat lurking around that can clog the arteries and cause heart attack. So,  reducing weight reduces the risk ultimately. 

Several studies say that blood fats and lipids change in the body, as weight sheds. Weight loss makes the triglycerides and LDL go down and HDL Cholesterol go up. It means that there’s more good cholesterol and less bad cholesterol and fat in the bloodstream. Resulting in reduced risk of heart diseases. 

Sometimes the blood slows down and forms clots. Healthy blood pressure and healthy weight indicate fewer blood clots. So toning down the body is a little less likely that a clot will break away or travel to heart, lungs or brain. 

Fat around the belly and the heart  is especially detrimental to health. Results from a research suggest that people with normal weight having ‘beer belly’ and a heart disease are more likely to get a heart attack. Research also suggests that hidden fat around the heart may be an even serious indicator of cardiac arrest. 

Negative Effects of Weight Loss on Heart Health

Although weight loss is great for the heart, rapid or sudden weight loss can be damaging to the blood vessels that leads to the fluctuation of heart rate, irregular heart rhythm, high or low blood pressure, thus the risk of a heart attack is increased. Although exercise helps in losing weight, it can be equally as dangerous for the body. 

Final Thoughts

Being overweight is no fun and games. Although losing weight can add to  reducing heart disease risk. People with lesser weight are equally likely to get a heart disease like other obese people. So, there is no direct relation seen here. But, there is a deep ‘connection’ between the two.  

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